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Author Topic: Time  (Read 1406 times)

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Offline pete

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Time
« on: March 08, 2015, 12:26:57 am »
Time is a measure in which events can be ordered from the past through the present into the future, and also the measure of durations of events and the intervals between them.  Time is often referred to as the fourth dimension, along with the spatial dimensions.

Time has long been a major subject of study in religion, philosophy, and science, but defining it in a manner applicable to all fields without circularity has consistently eluded scholars. Nevertheless, diverse fields such as business, industry, sports, the sciences, and the performing arts all incorporate some notion of time into their respective measuring systems.  Some simple definitions of time include "time is what clocks measure", which is a problematically vague and self-referential definition that utilizes the device used to measure the subject as the definition of the subject, and "time is what keeps everything from happening at once", which is without substantive meaning in the absence of the definition of simultaneity in the context of the limitations of human sensation, observation of events, and the perception of such events.

Daylight saving time

Daylight saving time (DST) or summer time (see "Terminology") is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months by one hour so that light extends into the evening hours—sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, users of DST adjust clocks forward one hour near the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to "normal" or regular time.

New Zealander George Vernon Hudson proposed the modern idea of daylight saving in 1895. Germany and Austria-Hungary organized the first implementation, starting on 30 April 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the energy crisis of the 1970s.

The practice has received both advocacy and criticism. Putting clocks forward benefits retailing, sports, and other activities that exploit sunlight after working hours, but can cause problems for evening entertainment and for other activities tied to the sun (such as farming) or to darkness (such as fireworks shows). Although some early proponents of DST aimed to reduce evening use of incandescent lighting (formerly a primary use of electricity), modern heating and cooling usage patterns differ greatly, and research about how DST currently affects energy use is limited or contradictory.

DST clock shifts sometimes complicate timekeeping and can disrupt meetings, travel, billing, record keeping, medical devices, heavy equipment, and sleep patterns.  Software can often adjust computer clocks automatically, but this can be limited and error-prone, particularly when various jurisdictions change the dates and timings of DST changes.

Daylight Saving Time Begins Sunday, March 8, 2015

Using the following statement for my IP cameras:  CST+6CDT+5,M3.2.0,M11.1.0
« Last Edit: March 08, 2015, 12:28:38 am by pete »
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Pete
Lockport, IL  USA

 

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